Kris Madaus ran: This run started out ...

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  • 21 miles
  • 04:38 time
  • 13:14 pace
  • 2583 calories
  •  
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  • 17355 ft climb
  • 0 max hr
  • 0 avg hr
    • Currently 5/5 Effort.
    effort 5/5
injured Crystal Springs DNF 20.96 mi 04:38 13:14 pace

This run started out great. The weather was perfect, and the route was canopied with pines, redwoods, and oaks. The first 6 miles was a rather steep hill. I was able to run most of it, but I held back a bit so I wouldn't wear myself out too fast. Things started to take a downturn just before mile 10 when I was bit by some kind of insect. I heard the buzz behind my right ear and waved my hand to keep the bug away, but it was already on my neck. A second later, it bit in. Pain shot through me. How could such a small insect hurt so bad? But I didn't stop running. The pain seemed to spread to the whole back side of my head, but it wasn't too bad to cause alarm. It was just like a persistent headache. When I hit the 12 mile aid station, I still felt rather strong and confident. My pace was better than expected, and I was almost at the halfway point. As I continued into a downhill piece, the right knee started hurting. I didn't pay much attention, hoping it would go away as it has done in the past. By mile 14, it was clear that it was getting worse. In addition, my muscles were already feeling much more sore than they should at this point. Throughout all of my training runs, I didn't feel that sore that early in the run. Why? It continued to get worse. From mile 15 on, sharp pain would sporadically shoot through my knee, I had to walk a lot, and I was getting past by everyone. I tried to give myself encouragement. I knew it would be hard, and this is it. Just keep going! But by mile 18, it was clear that I could be causing damage to my knee, especially on the downhill, and most of the rest of the course was downhill. Even walking hurt the knee by that point. After tearing myself apart about it, I decided I needed to call it early. My first DNF. But since it was a trail marathon, I still had three miles to go to get to a road. That 3 miles was hell. My head hurt from the bite, my knee hurt, my muscles were incredibly sore. It was as if all of my training was for nothing, like I wasn't prepared. The course was not more difficult than my training runs. It was actually easier than I expected. I slowly made my way to the road, and waited for Jill. Failure. I knew it was the right decision to stop, but I trained for months for this race, and I have never had a DNF in any sport. I don't quit - ever. But I'm not stupid either. I am going to see a sports doctor to get my legs strengthened, and I'm going to come back and kill this course.

  • Chelsea T.
    Chelsea T.

    Aw, Kris, I'm sorry to hear that it was so hard! You did the right thing by listening to when your body is telling you to stop. Everyone of your dailymile friends probably know that you could definitely have done this race, but at what cost?? I hope you start feeling better. Way to go on your 21 miles!! :)

    over 5 years ago Like

  • Chelsea T.
    Chelsea T.

    Plus, we need to you keep logging your miles and inspiring us to run more ;-)

    over 5 years ago Like

  • Kris M.
    Kris M.

    Thanks to both of you. It's time to add strength training into my routine and head back to take out that course. I don't think I'll feel good about the decision until I finish the course. Very mixed feelings about the whole thing. But in the big scheme of things, it really makes no difference what happens, and I need to keep that in mind.

    over 5 years ago Like

  • Kim R.
    Kim R.

    I'm sorry I'm delaying in responding to this post. Deciding to listen to your body and stop running during a race is one of the hardest things for runners, athletes, anyone who likes to challenge themselves to do. I'm so proud of you for making the right decision. If you hadn't we could reading posts now about how your doctor has told you to take six weeks off, or about how your knee is swollen and it's still hard to walk on it. So glad you listened & I have 100% confidence that you'll kill this race!

    over 5 years ago Like

  • Kris M.
    Kris M.

    Thanks Kim. You might be right. It's hard to convince myself of that in retrospect, but it is just a run. We shouldn't take any race all that seriously anyway. Life's too short for that. :)

    over 5 years ago Like1 person

  • Jill S.
    Jill S. Get Better
    Get Better:

    I totally agree with Chelsea! The point is to live to run another day. How long do you want to be laid up with a bad knee? better to call it early and rehab a moderately injured knee than finish and spend months rehabing a blown-out knee. Good call!

    over 5 years ago