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How to get energy from a very low carb diet?

asked over 5 years ago | Report

Im currently at 285 and I'm just trying to lose weight as fast and healthy as possible to become a better cyclist. I do ride a alot so exercise is not a problem the diet is going to be the harder hill to climb. So any tips would help on helping me achieve the goal of getting down to at least 200.

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  • i'm not sure how to do that because i think you need carbs to fuel your body and brain. taking some it not bad but you cant take them out completley. bad for cyclists. i did go to school for this too and should know the answer. i know that there is energy from fat and proteins by usuing different energy systems like glycolosis and krebs cycle. and that requires long slow style excerising. and i think that by supplementing B vitamins you can convert the carbs to energy a lot smoother. i would do some research cause i'm not in tune with all of these new diets. i eat steak potatoes, pasta, chinese food, all of it but stay away from sugars, fast food, and beer.

    sorry wish i had a answer

    to be honest and it sounds like a smart ass answer is this. keep your diet the same take out all the junk foods and candy, and ride your bike a little more every week. you will loose weight, this is my way of loosing weight in this part of the season coming into my first race in late january. right now i'm 10 lbs over weight and i dont do anything different to my diet but just ride more. i gain the weight cause i go from racing a shit ton to nothing at alll and then my t.i. t. s. (time in the saddle) goes down.
    danny

    answered over 5 years ago |Report

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  • You probably won't like my answers, but sugar and caffeine. What are you trying to accomplish, as it's really hard to give you any personal feedback without knowing what your goal in doing this is.

    answered over 5 years ago |Report

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  • Here's a link to an awesome website http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/carbohydrate-basics-ga.htm...from what i've read and learned you need carbs, especially athletes. Your body converts it to glycogen which is fuel for your muscles which is why you carbo load the night before a big race. Once you use all the glycogen, you hit the 'wall' and then your body starts burning fat cells for fuel. Carbs also help your muscles repair and recover after hard workouts too. Weight loss is all about eating the right foods and burning calories. I've read alot on www.howstuffworks.com and it explains everything.

    answered over 5 years ago |Report

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  • Need more info. Are you doing low carb for medical reasons, weight loss? If for weight loss, I've found it very effective to increase carbs from green leafies and beans, and decrease them from grains. And I echo that cutting the refined processed carbs will help improve the quality of the fuel you're putting into your body.

    The other thing to pay attention to is when you eat carb-intensive meals. From what I've read, our bodies digest carbs most efficiently in that 30 minutes - 1 hour window post workout.

    Then again (true confession time) between yesterday and today I ate a can of frosting all by myself. Yes it was lovely, and no, I won't be doing that again any time soon. So take what I say with a grain of salt (cube of sugar?)! ;)

    answered over 5 years ago |Report

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  • Basically what everybody else has said, get rid of the "empty calories" i.e. sodas, junk foods, etc. Basically the foods that give you lots of calories, but no nutrients (vitamins and minerals). Do not, I repeat, DO NOT, do the whole Atkins, (don't eat carbs and lose weight) thing, it doesn't work. Your body is built to use carbs. It is the first thing your body looks for, because if you don't have carbs, then your body will look elsewhere, and this means breaking down your muscle to use as energy.

    The best thing you can do is to count your calories. Try monitoring what you eat on four consecutive days. Then average them out. Once you get that data, try lowering your caloric intake from 200-500 calories. This is the time to get rid of those empty calories.

    Also, breakfast is the most important meal, do NOT skip it. It is very important. So yea, no miracle diets. Just lower the calories, and since you're already riding again, you'll start losing those pounds. Guaranteed buddy :)

    answered over 5 years ago |Report

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  • Agreed, very low carb diets do not work for endurance athletes. Agreed, best source of carbs is non processed foods, fruits, green veggies and beans. AVOID refined sugar and foods that act like sugar, like white bread, potatoes, processed grains. I used an Isagenix 30 day nutrition/cleansing program with fantastic results. For more info www.findperfecthealth.com

    answered over 5 years ago |Report

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  • In addition to the suggestions provided in this post, consider weight training as a fat loss. In addition to calories burned during training, there is the EPOC effect; that is, after training calories that are consumed. If you train properly, MORE calories are torched post training than during. In addition, as you build some muscle, the muscle will require additional fuel and thus more calories will be burned, even while you are watching the Tour de France.

    In my experience, either functional strength training or old-fashion "stations" (aka. Turbo training) provide the most fat loss benefits.

    You will also experience "side-benefits" of strengthening the bones, not to mention being stronger on everyone's favorite -- the hills.

    answered over 5 years ago |Report

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  • Looks like you updated the original question, so I'll try to answer it again.

    1. how old are you?
    2. how much do you ride now?
    3. what riding goals do you have?
    4. at your current weight, depending how tall you are, don't expect more than 2-3 pound losses per week with an initial spike of 4-6 when you start and after a few weeks, a stall of 1-2 pounds.

    August 1st I weighed 240lbs. January 3rd I weighed in at 186lbs, a 54 pound drop in about 5 months. Here's how: http://www.randomn3ss.com/10-tips-that-helped-me-lose-weight/

    I didn't do this, but a lot of people say keeping a food journal helps, i.e., write down everything you eat for a week, look back and see what you don't need, what you could substitute, etc. etc.

    I'd avoid any sort of "diet" - whether it's low carb, low fat, low this or low that, you need a lifestyle change so you can lose the weight and keep it off.

    answered over 5 years ago |Report

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  • I would say that you probably shouldn't go on a very low carb diet - not if you want to gain any muscle/improve performance/last very long.

    Like everyone else has said, you need carbs - and a 'very' low carb diet won't do anything but make you feel miserable - and if you're working out, you're better off going with a 40/40/30 ratio of protein/carbs/fats and fuel your body Efficiently - (of course you want 'good foods' for all of those categories.)

    Those ratios along with a calorie deficit will help you lose weight fast along with keeping up your strength for the workouts.

    AND - you'll probably stick to your meal/workout plan longer since you actually get to eat some good food.

    answered over 5 years ago |Report

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  • I tried the low carb thing works if you dont want to work you just got to do the good carbs and leave the bad carbs alone cant have a fire without fuel lol plus i droped from 365 to 225

    answered over 5 years ago |edited over 5 years ago |Report

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  • Clearly the people who answered this question know nothing of the low-carb lifestyle. There are many, many athletes who live low carb and also weight train very hard and still find energy to do so. The key is high intensity for shorter periods...ie faster cycling for shorter periods.

    There are many ways to obtain energy without overloading on high caloric foods. Do some research online to get food ideas. There are also energy drinks to choose from. Anyone who tells you to fuel on on sugar before a workout is insane. On a low carb diet you won't be able to spend the entire day in a gym, because your body is burning a high level of fat already.

    Read this article, it's helpful and proves you can be an endurance athlete while eating low carb..you just have to know how to manipulate your body the right way.

    http://www.mm2k.com/low-carb-bodybuilding.html

    answered over 5 years ago |Report

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  • ride more, you need carbs dude

    answered almost 5 years ago |Report

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  • Eat Clean Diet is not a low carb diet but complex carbs choosing better sources, less refined crap, The basic concept of the diet is to mix a lean protein and complex carb at every meal. It is also balanced. I have found this to be a better eating lifestyle..lots of athletes and body builders use this diet or concepts of it. Lots of smaller meals. I eat all the carbs I want just complex and lower GI carbs after 3:00 PM. Sample Breakfast Steelcut oatmeal with blueberries no sugar or whey protein powder followed by egg white omelette.

    answered almost 5 years ago |Report

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  • Dr. Stephen Phinney is an endurance cyclist and has done 30 years of research on keto-adapted endurance athletes including actually cutting muscles (biopsies) and measuring glucose consumption and use in the muscle tissue before and after races

    His clinical trials have shown the following

    -You must fully keto-adapt and stay that way. In other words get into ketosis, and stay there, period
    -If you do above, after a time you will consume 25% of the glucose for the same amount of work (people do not like to admit it, but ketones are a wonderful fuel source for skeletal muscle, and running on ketones produces less lactic acid)
    -If you have a cheat day, you reset and pretty much start over to regain the benefits
    -Performance drops, A LOT, during adaption, but after adaption occurs it is fully restored

    Many Ironman athletes train in ketosis as they know it pays off in the later parts of the race.

    Do you need carbs to train harder? In the end, not likely according to the athletes that actually make the commitment to it. But it is certainly not the easiest choice when recovery shakes and pasta dinners abound.

    answered over 2 years ago |Report

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