Forums/

Newbies

Walking shoes or running shoes?

posted over 7 years ago | Report

(I fear this question shows my complete ignorance about such things, but I really don't know!)

What's the difference between "walking shoes" and "running shoes"?

If I'm doing C25K, which is a combination, and I'm still doing mostly walking, does it matter which kind of shoe I'm wearing?

If I plan on sometimes running (or at least doing the C25K program), sometimes walking, and sometimes doing the elliptical, should I wear different shoes for the running and walking?

I know I need new shoes, I just have no idea what to get. And in case it matters, I have wide and very flat feet (have had flat feet since early childhood) and wear custom orthodics. Also, no matter what type of shoe I get, I have trouble getting it laced so that my heel doesn't slip - if it's tight enough to keep my heel from slipping, it's too tight elsewhere.

Any websites out there that can help me with these questions?

11 posts

scroll to bottom
  • I don't know the difference but I've been told it's better to just get running shoes. I'm sure the store told me why but I don't remember.

    As for the heel slippage, I have the same problem. Have you tried heel lock lacing? It helps a little. http://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/locklacing.htm

    posted over 7 years ago

  • in reply to what Mimi said:I don't know the difference but I've been told it's better to just get running shoes. I'm sure the store told me why but I don't remember. As for the heel slippage, I have the same problem. Have you tried heel lock lacing... read more

    This is how I do it too. Running shoes generally have an extra set of eyelets at the top opening next to the final set of the column of eyelets that go down the upper toward the toes (does that make sense?). If you do the lace lock using that eyelet set it will pull the back of the upper around your ankles more snugly, thereby locking your heel in.

    The laces in the lower eyelets don't need to be as tight as the uppermost set. Generally, I find that if it's too tight across the instep (the highest point on the top of your foot), it impedes blood supply and my feet go numb. Numb feet or pain in the center just behind your toes means your shoe is too tight. If your foot shifts within the shoe or your heel lifts up, it's too loose. Your running shoes should fit snug.

    As for walking shoes, I believe they are less flexible in the sole with more of a rolling toe-off and sometimes a cutout on the heel for big, long heel-to-toe walking strides. You're doing C25K, so yes you are walking now quite a bit, but it won't be long before you're running longer intervals and since your ultimate goal is to run, go for the running shoes. In all likelihood, you'll complete C25K before you'll need to replace your running shoes.

    Please make sure, though, you get the right shoes for your feet and, if need be, return them, if the running store get's it wrong. In my admittedly amateur advice, don't run in shoes that cause issues for your feet and body.

    posted over 7 years ago

  • Thanks for the responses! One of the issues I face is that as far as I know, there IS no "running store" withing at least 30 miles of here, just a bunch of outlets staffed by folks who don't know anything except how to run the register.

    posted over 7 years ago

  • in reply to what Abuela M. said:Thanks for the responses! One of the issues I face is that as far as I know, there IS no "running store" withing at least 30 miles of here, just a bunch of outlets staffed by folks who don't know anything except how to run the regis... read more

    Hey Abuela,

    I don't know the real difference between the two but I can say that my running shoes are way much lighter than my walking shoes. Also, and I'm pretty sure its because of the running shoes I got (Nike frees) they arent very comfortable for a long walking spell. They feel great while running but if I'm walking alot there's not enough cushion. Hope that helps. Also, my mom always get New Balance shoes for cross training the cost isn't to bad and you can usually find them about any shoe store and they make alot of different models depending on what type of foot you have. Just some ideas.

    posted over 7 years ago

  • check out "The Shoe Dog" at www.roadrunnersports.com It has a neat little (easy) home test you can do to learn more about your foot and it will recommend shoes to you.

    posted over 7 years ago

  • Heather. thank you!! That is a very cool tool. I'm pretty sure that I over-pronate but I don't want to buy something based on that assumption until I get the gait eval Friday. It pointed me to these: http://www.roadrunnersports.com/rrs/products/NBA1453/ that look like they might work for me - I used to wear only New Balance, but I can't find them (except in clearance outlets) where I live now, and the customer feedback is all from folks whose feet sound like mine, and they love them.

    posted over 7 years ago

  • Kim
    Kim Sendmail

    I have always heard that if you are a doing walk/run approach or run/walks either way, that you can always walk in a running shoe, but should never run in a walking shoe. I understand they are not made with the same type of impact cushioning/design that running shoes are and are often quite a bit heavier and clunkier, which can cause injuries.

    posted over 7 years ago

  • in reply to what Abuela M. said:Heather. thank you!! That is a very cool tool. I'm pretty sure that I over-pronate but I don't want to buy something based on that assumption until I get the gait eval Friday. It pointed me to these: http://www.roadrunnersports.com/rrs/p... read more

    I know I'm probably opening a big can of worms here, but...

    Get your gait evaluated before buying those extremely beefy shoes. Do you really overpronate so badly? Those are designed for extreme overpronators and I'd hesitate to buy a motion-control shoe without giving it a try. There's a fair amount of evidence that motion control shoes cause more injury than any other type: http://www.runblogger.com/2010/07/pronation-control-paradgim-is-starting.html (Thank you runblogger!)

    FWIW, that evaluator puts me in a stability shoe, which would be utter overkill for my neutral, midfoot-strike, short stride gait. I wouldn't put a great deal of stock into an online shoe evaluator.

    posted over 7 years ago

  • I'm not going to buy anything without confirmation on my gait and a recommendation from my podiatrist - who is also a runner. :)

    posted over 7 years ago

  • Go with running shoes. They offer more of a variety of support options for your biomechanics. I think walking shoes are just a marketing scheme.

    posted over 7 years ago

  • nice job, find nice New running shoes air jordanNew running shoes running shoes, check shoetocheap.ru

    my running shoes come from this site,recommed all of u

    posted over 3 years ago

Similar Discussions in General - Newbies