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New to jogging and shins hurt only when running.

asked about 5 years ago | Report

I have been running 4x week/all in a row and 1st day good, 2nd day shins hurt when I run only and so on. Then I rest on weekend and it starts hurting my 2nd day. I bought new shoes. Didn't help. Any advice.

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  • It's always difficult, and risky, to diagnose running injuries/pain without a good thorough exam. So the best advice, especially if you're just starting out and new to running, is to ensure you have access to a good sports medicine based doctor. That said....

    In general, the two common causes of shin splints are improper shoes for your foot type (ie. you've neutral shoes yet you over pronate, etc) and adding too much mileage too soon.

    For your shoes be sure you go to a running specialty store and talk to the staff there who know how to check your feet and stride and recommend the correct shoes for you. If you're in a shoe store and you have any doubt about whether they are knowledgable about running and runners, well you probably aren't in the right store then so find another. And for reference, the Foot Lockers of the world are not running stores. :-)

    When it come to adding too much mileage to soon that's a matter of conditioning your body and muscles to the rigorous pounding. If you're just starting out your legs have an immense amount of stuff to learn, walking simply doesn't prepare our species for the rigors of running. The muscles in the soles of your feet, your ankles, your calves, your knees...all these will need to become accustomed to the workout and be strengthened. The general rule of thumb is to never add more than 10% a week to your mileage.

    If you take it slow and safe and have appropriate shoes your legs and ankles and feet will develop well and you'll be running greater distances, and with more ease, than you thought possible before you started to run. I remember the first time I said to my running partners after I'd only been running for 5 months (in summer 2008) "omg, I can remember when 3 miles seemed like it was so hard and so long and now we're running 8". Take good care of yourself and stay injury free and you'll get there.

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

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  • I bought one of those sleeves with pretty material, filled with beads you heat or freeze. The first few months of running my shins screamed everytime i went out. I kept that sleeve in the freezer and would lay it across my shins after a run. What relief! That saved me until I could work through it. I guess ice wrapped in a towel would be just as soothing. About two or three months into running, it stopped hurting--just like that! Good Luck, AlisaG.

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

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  • If it is just annoying or discomfort it is likely that you can run through it. It is very common to have the nagging pains when you are starting running. As your legs get stronger the pains will likely go away. If it is so bad that it keeps you from starting a run you need to see your doctor.

    It is unlikely the shoes. You would think for $100+ they would fix your aches, but that is almost never the case.

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

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  • I use to get shin splints in soccer. Taping my shins always got me through games and workouts. Hang in there it'll get better.

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

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  • Make sure you're doing a short warmup before your run, a slower pace than you're regular pace, like maybe a fast walk for a 1/4 mile before your usual 2 miles or so. Of course, the most important part is gettin in a really good stretch AFTER your run. Stretch those calves and hamstrings so that you don't tighten up for your run the next day!

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

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  • I had the same problem when I first started running. I found that stretching and strengthening my calf muscles made a significant difference. The pain stopped after just a few weeks. Here's a link to a video with a simple but effective way to both stretch and strengthen. good luck!

    http://www.livestrong.com/video/2754-strengthen-calf-muscles/

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

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  • That was happening to me so I went to a running shop and they fitted me with the proper shoe & now my shins don't hurt anymore... good luck

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

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  • Kmc
    Kmc Sendmail

    My brother, a marathon runner and running coach, fit me for the longest time with good shoes. It does make a miraculous difference. But, last year, all of a sudden I had this crazy pain screaming from my shins. I had never had it before. The only thing I had done different was a sprint down a huge hill. So, I take it a little easier going down those hills. It also helps to run on the blacktop as opposed to cement, and the grass is even better. My brother tells me, j"ust take some ibuprofen and get back out there." Best of luck with your running. Give it some time before giving it up.
    Kmc

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

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  • Bear in mind when reading this answer that I suffered bilateral tibia stress fractures last year, so I've put myself through a crash course when it comes to identifying shin pain.

    In general there are two types of shin pain, muscular and bone. Characteristic stress fracture pain includes pain at the beginning and after a run. For me the pain always seemed worse the day after a race. I ran on the fractures for 2 months and on those days I could barely walk down the stairs. Other symptoms include pain on percussion of the bone (tap up and down the length of your shin bone) and sometimes a palpable lump along the bone.

    Muscle pain generally responds well to ice, massage, and stretching and is temporary as opposed to continuous. I am enclosing a link to a great article that discusses different types and locations of pain and when to consult a MD. It also shows some great stretches and exercises to strengthen your calf muscles and help alleviate the pain or prevent stress fractures. ---> http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_5/196.shtml

    You also might want to revisit your workout routine. Your subject line says that you're new to running, but you state that you are running 4 days in a row. While not the only beginner plan out there, you might be better off with a Tu/Th/Sat/Sun routine. You can cross-train (swim, bike, etc) on Wed/Fri if you want and keep Monday as a strictly off day. You'll still get your 4 days a week, but you'll give your leg muscle the time they need to recover between runs. Weak and tired muscles lead to sloppy form and sloppy form leads to bones and joints absorbing the force (roughly 4X your body weight) of each step. And while not strictly limited to women, poor nutrition also increases the risk for fractures. You might consider a Calcium and Vit D supplement depending on your situation. You'll also need lean protein to help those muscle recover and build.

    Another potential pitfall for new runners is adding too many miles too quickly. A basic rule of thumb is the 10% rule. Long run days and totally weekly mileage should increase by no more than 10% from one week to the next. Personally I break this sometimes, but I also keep it in the back of my mind and try not to go too crazy just because I feel great. If nothing else the rule will prevent you from running 16 miles one week and 28 the next just because you can.

    This is a huge topic, but hopefully this gets you pointed in the right direction. I sincerely wish you many many happy and fun miles of training and success in any races you enter. I don't know what distance if any you are training for, but I recommend this book for any beginner --> http://www.runfasterdaddy.com/book-reviews/the-marathon-method-by-tom-holland/ I recommend it mainly because of Tom Holland's emphasis on training to be injury free.

    Also, every Tuesday is Training Tip Tuesday on my blog. Check it out and see what you think. Blog is listed on my dailymile profile.

    Cheers.

    answered about 5 years ago |edited about 5 years ago |Report

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  • You can do it, You can do it, You can do it....
    Just keep telling yourself that.

    I run, and it may not look pretty, and I may not look like it's easy for me, but I'm doing it. And so are you!!

    Read a great quote tonight,
    "You may run slow, but it faster than someone sitting on a couch"

    answered almost 6 years ago |Report

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  • Sounds like you are the victim of shin splints also called osteitus or the "Swiss Cheese effect." This is normal especially for new runners and even more so for new female runners. What happens is that your shin bones can't keep up with the stress of your work out. The osteoplast, (bone building cells), are trying to break down your bone structure and build it back up. The new bone that is built is "green" however. It takes a bit of time to completely harden. When you keep adding additional stress to the new bone it does not provide the expected support needed for your plantarus (shin muscle), gastrocnemius Calf muscle), and other muscles to anchor themselves. Without the support your muscles need they become tired more quickly and stiff, and your shins start to hurt telling you, "I need more time to rest."

    So two recommendations here:
    1. Listen to your body. Give them time to rest, ( try a week or maybe even two weeks). Soft shoes only, low impact aerobic activity only. An exercise to try is to place a towel on the floor, but your bare feet on the towel, and pull the towel under your feet using only your toes. When there is no more towel, reposition and repeat.

    2. After three weeks and you still have shin splints; see a medical professional for a bone scan. This is to confirm or deny stress fractures. If stress fractures are present you could out of training for a while. Even surgery can be used for stress fractures.

    One last comment, shoes are everything. Spend some money on a great pair of running shoes. Do your research. You might be surprised the Nike and New Balance are just as good as those $500 running shoes from those fancy smancy stores.

    answered almost 5 years ago |Report

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