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Self-coach for Olympic Triathlon?

posted about 2 years ago | Report

I've been self-coaching myself for the sprint triathlons I've been doing over the past few years. Now I want to make the jump to a longer distance.

Anyone self-coaching themselves while training for this length distance? I assume if I follow a plan online and err on the side of caution to avoid injury it's pretty safe. Your thoughts?

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  • Love your attitude about being cautious to avoid injury. You can do it.
    Never ''officially'' finished an Olympic tri (long story), but I did self-coach myself for an Ironman distance tri this summer, Iron Dartmouth. Finished it under the 15 hour time limit. I used the book, from Triathlete magazine, ' Essential Week-by-Week Training Guide'. It was recommended by a friend and I had actually bought it over 5 years ago and never used it.It covers all the distance tris and is for all categories of athletes from beginner to expert level. I 'almost' followed it religiously and logged in my workouts in a log book I bought off the magazine's site.
    Find a plan that suits you and go for it! My thoughts during the whole process was to train as best I could and finish.
    Happy training!
    :+)

    posted about 2 years ago

  • I've done this and if i can you can. find a plan that works for you and go for it (and try to your best to listen to your body for when it needs rest or is achey) i like the trinewbies.com plans but beginnertriathlete and trifuel.com both have free generic training plans as well

    posted about 2 years ago

  • I've self coached to multiple marathons, ironmans, 100 mile ultra trail marathons. When something doesn't feel right I back off on speed first, distance second. The nice thing about tri's is you can always switch up. If you have done multiple sprints, you can go longer. You know when something doesn't feel right. When / if that happens back off. Enjoy the process. Enjoy the race.

    posted about 2 years ago

  • in reply to what Rina M. said:Love your attitude about being cautious to avoid injury. You can do it. Never ''officially'' finished an Olympic tri (long story), but I did self-coach myself for an Ironman distance tri this summer, Iron Dartmouth. Finished it... read more

    Thanks! Congrats on your Ironman...I'm not sure I could do that!

    posted about 2 years ago

  • in reply to what Joe H. said:I've done this and if i can you can. find a plan that works for you and go for it (and try to your best to listen to your body for when it needs rest or is achey) i like the trinewbies.com plans but beginnertriathlete and trifuel.com both ha... read more

    Thanks for the encouragement Joe!

    posted about 2 years ago

  • in reply to what Chris B. said:I've self coached to multiple marathons, ironmans, 100 mile ultra trail marathons. When something doesn't feel right I back off on speed first, distance second. The nice thing about tri's is you can always switch up. If you have ... read more

    Yes, I agree that when something doesn't feel right it's best to back off. Since you've done so much--what do you think about running a 10K a couple of times in the spring before the tri? I've always done this with my sprints because running is my weakest part...however, I find that in a tri by the time I get to the run I'm feeling really good because I'm warmed up and it's the "end" so to speak. Thanks for your post!

    posted about 2 years ago

  • in reply to what April L. said:Yes, I agree that when something doesn't feel right it's best to back off. Since you've done so much--what do you think about running a 10K a couple of times in the spring before the tri? I've always done this with my sprints... read more

    If running is your weakest event, then I would say running a couple 10k's is a great idea. You will gain more by improving your weakness than by further honing your strengths. Just keep the races in perspective, you don't want to run so hard that you lose a week of training afterwards.

    In training I try to do a short run after most rides just to be in the habit of transitioning smoothly.

    Also, as you add distance, keeping on top of nutition/hydration during the bike leg becomes more important. Make sure you do a few bike / run workouts of similar distance to know how its going to feel and to get it all worked out.

    posted about 2 years ago

  • in reply to what Chris B. said:If running is your weakest event, then I would say running a couple 10k's is a great idea. You will gain more by improving your weakness than by further honing your strengths. Just keep the races in perspective, you don't want to run s... read more

    Yes, points taken. Thanks!!

    posted about 2 years ago

  • yeah- I've self coached to a 70.3 and a couple marathons. that said- I've read books, and totally immersed myself in forums and magazines. I did it all wrong my first marathon and learned my lesson.

    one tip: 90% of it is VOLUME. i.e the amount you swim/bike/run. not the speed, the intensity... those are just the details. The most important part is spending a lot of time out there exercising.

    Swimming: Mostly hard- somtimes easy
    Biking: Sometimes hard, sometimes easy - lotsa' miles
    running: Mostly easy, sometimes hard

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • I have coached myself up to Olympic tris. I am going for a 1/2 this year and a full next year (2014) and am trying to decide what to do. I have a triathlon club somewhat near me that I could use, but part of me loves the idea of pushing myself to the next limit. Not sure.

    posted over 1 year ago

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