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Running shoes life span

posted almost 2 years ago | Report

On average, how long or how much mileage do your shoes last? Which make and model last the longest?

17 posts

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  • I think the usual answer to this is 300-500 miles, though some people get many more miles than 500. Basically if you start having unexplained pains out of the blue, you may want to look at how many miles are on your shoes. I don't believe there is a set answer on which make/model lasts the longest as weight and style of foot strike really makes a difference.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • What Michael says is true. You will get about 300-500 miles on a pair of running shoes, if that is all you are doing in them. I have heard stories of people going more than 800 miles in some shoes, but that's probably due to their running style more than the shoe itself.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • I've always heard that the average is about 400 miles and the make/model doesn't matter that much.

    I've also heard that by alternating your shoes, you can extend the life of them considerably because it gives the shoe cushion and sole a chance to recover before the next run.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • Thanks Michael. You are right, A light footed small person would have shoes last way longer than a heavy footed large person. Good point.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • Thank you Ray. I have a pair of Merrell road glove, a pair FFV KSO. I think I am shop a pair of trial/road runner mix to rotate them. The KSO is too tight to do runs longer than 5k. I can't wait til they are stretched out.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • I buy a number of pairs of shoes at one time. If I find a pair I really like, i.e. Asics Nimbus 12, I stock up (now they are GONE), but, I change out shoes consistently about every other month. Terrible, I know, but it has helped save my knees, feet and everything else. I imagine it is about 200-250 miles. I run heavily and am an older runner. I consider regular new running shoes my special treat to myself.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • I typically put 1000-2000 miles on every pair of shoes. Yes, thousand. I weigh 136 and also rotate shoes and do a fair amount of barefoot running. I train up to 100 miles/week when focusing on a marathon or ultra. Usually what makes me toss them is when a hole wears in the inside lining and causes blisters. It may not wok for many others, but seems to be ok for me and I don't get injured. The interesting thing to me is that racing flats seem to wear better than trainers.

    Having said all that, if shoes don't feel right I'll toss them after a couple hundred miles. But that hasn't happened for a long time.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • If you're in road gloves and VFFs then you're probably a forefoot striker. In that case, your cushion comes from your calves, not from your shoes, so you can run in them until they fall apart. Heelstrikers need to change their shoes every 300 or so miles since they rely on rubber, not their calves to do the job (poor bastards!)

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • in reply to what Gil R. said:If you're in road gloves and VFFs then you're probably a forefoot striker. In that case, your cushion comes from your calves, not from your shoes, so you can run in them until they fall apart. Heelstrikers need to change their shoes ever... read more

    Thank you Gil. Now I understand more. Chris B's respond was he can put 1000-2000 miles on his shoes. I was so envy of the way he run. It has to be very smooth to achieve that mileage.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • in reply to what Chris B. said:I typically put 1000-2000 miles on every pair of shoes. Yes, thousand. I weigh 136 and also rotate shoes and do a fair amount of barefoot running. I train up to 100 miles/week when focusing on a marathon or ultra. Usually what makes me toss th... read more

    I envy you. You must be a smooth runner to achieve that kind of mileage both on your legs and shoes.
    And thank you for the sharing your experience, They are valuable to me.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • Would changing out the inserts make a difference?

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • In theory, no. Once a pair of running shoes has lost it's cushioning ability, a new pair of inserts is not good enough to help.

    But one of the key ideas behind the behind the barefoot/minimalist movement is that the human foot's built in suspension system is nothing short of miraculous and that modern running shoes have not only encouraged bad running form but actually get in the way of the human foot's natural ability to cushion itself. (After 7 months in my NB Minimus, the ride feels at least 90% as cushioned as my cushioned running shoes. It is a pretty amazing feeling!)

    In that light, the 300-500 mile life span of modern running shoes appears to be nothing more than planned obsolescence. And there is no reason not to expect a 1000-5000 mile lifespan out a pair of minimalist shoes since there is no cushioning to wear out in the first place. It is why someone with good running form can put 1000-2000 miles on a pair of semi-cushioned shoes and be totally happy with the ride. It is also why most "minimalist" would feel that cushioned inserts would do absolutely nothing to improve on our feet's natural ability to cushion themselves.

    One caveat: the transition to minimalist shoes, for anyone who wants to make the journey, should be done gradually. Going back and forth between a good quality pair of cushioned shoes, from a good store with a knowledgeable staff, to make sure we stay injury free until the muscles in our feet have developed the strength to support themselves just seems like good common sense :-)

    posted almost 2 years ago | edited almost 2 years ago

  • I totally agree with making the transition slowly. One of the things that bugs me about the whole minimalist movement is they give the impression that all you have to do is throw away your shoes and all your medical problems will be solved. Probably not.

    I also limit my barefoot running to very specific safe areas and give it up totally the last month before a race. If I've been training a few months for a specific race, I'm not going to risk a stubbed toe or cut the week before.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • I totally agree with Chris B. I'll take a pair of racing flats and run them until they are falling apart and won't notice the difference in the wear. A standard pair of running shoes seems to die on me around mile 600 (I'm 170 lbs) because of the sweat and cushioning breakdown.

    So wish I could find another pair of Brooks Mach XI's...

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • in reply to what Zoey C. said:I totally agree with Chris B. I'll take a pair of racing flats and run them until they are falling apart and won't notice the difference in the wear. A standard pair of running shoes seems to die on me around mile 600 (I'm 170 lbs... read more

    Thank you Zoey C. I put 345km on my Merrell Road Glove so far since June. So say, 3 month. I notice hardly any wear at the bottom of my shoes other than some wear at the out skirt of heel area; right foot in particular. I do not why as I am a forefoot striker. When I get tired, I tend to move to mid foot strike, but never heel strike unless going down steep hill which does not happen often. Come to think of it, may be it was wear out from hill run repeats. Anyway, base on what I saw on the wear at the bottom of my shoes, it should be able to last me 3 times longer at least. So 1000 km or 9 months. I am happy.

    posted almost 2 years ago

  • With Traditional Trainers there is this mistaken belief that the Cushioning compacts over time and they loose their cushioning and get hard.

    What typically happens is that the structure in the midsole material starts to break down....over time the structure becomes more and more open, Which results in the midsole actually getting softer.

    This isnt such a problem if the midsole is thin, but in a traditional trainer with a fairl thick midsole what happens is that it starts to create a U shape under the forefoot... ie the middle of your foot sinks lower than the edges... This is bad.

    Day to day its hard to notice this happening, and it happens at various speeds depending on the runner. but what you can do is take your shoe off and just compare how much softer it is in the middle of the forefoot to a brand new shoe... If its markedly softer it could be time to think about a new pair.

    Minimal Shoes with little to no cushioning dont suffer this problem and you should be able to run in them as long as they hold together and have sufficient grip for your purposes. (id suggest a pair of Trail gloves with teh tread worn off are no longer suitable for the trail...but maybe great for the road)

    posted almost 2 years ago

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    posted about 1 month ago

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