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911....IT band treatment...foam roller...how it worked for you and how often and when you used it?

asked almost 5 years ago | Report

Struggling with some IT issues....Marathon in approx 3 weeks. I have the roller and am attempting to use it 3 times daily...but do i do it before exercise...after exercise or both and what about ice packs...before ? after ? both

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  • I've used it both before and after runs. Doing it gently before helps to stretch it out and get it warmed up a bit, so running won't stretch it too quickly and hurt it. After can help stop it from becoming too tight. I think the important thing is not to be too aggressive with it at first. Better to take more time and work into it gently (even if you work into deep massaging) rather than getting impatient. The other thing is to slow down your training, especially in the beginning of the run. Rolling it out won't do a whole lot of good if you're hurting it during the run.

    I don't have much experience icing at the same time, but I would imagine you shouldn't ice before rolling since it will tighten your IT whereas the roller stretches it.

    answered almost 5 years ago |Report

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  • This one is near and dear to me because my IT Band syndrome became so bad I'm one of the few that had to have corrective surgery. After being diagnosed with ITBS (and like an idiot) I continued to compete. It took one calendar year and five races for the syndrome to become permanent (I couldn't run more than 100 yards even after taking 3 months off). Even though I took some radical steps to continue competition, I want you to know my races were extremely painful, I failed to meet my goal times, and I put myself out of competition for months because I didn't listen to people who knew better than me. There are no quick fixes for IT Band syndrome. Here is what I did so I could keep competing (in no way do I recommend you do these things - you need professional medical advice and these things are just what I did to try to stay in competition - ultimately I became very injured as a result). 1) use the roller at least 20 minutes per day (at least 10 on each leg) every day; 2) stop running and get on an eliptical or a bike - you can also swim for maintaining cardio fitness (your IT Band needs time off from the pounding of running, so save it for your race); 3) ice after every training session and at night before you go to bed; 4) have your doc refer you to a PT, do the icing, electro-stim, wet heat, and stretching that will be prescribed (the PT will work on you for at least 30 minutes; it is painful but helps); 5) there is a topical named Voltaren gel that is available by prescription only - it is an anti-inflammatory that is drawn through the skin and very effective but don't exceed the 4 grams per application (I split out the dosage and applied half at the halfway point of my races) and know that it has the same effects as oral anti-inflammatories; 6) I stayed more hydrated than I had previously (and since) during races and took Tylenol halfway through each race; 7) if you can get it (and it is not without controversy), get a cortizone injection not less than 72 hours before the race. I was warned about combining Voltaren with cortizone but did not experience the potential bad effects from the combination. ITBS is nothing to mess around with and ultimately the best thing you can do is rest and come back slowly. I did not listen to the advice of my coaches and my good friend who is an orthopaedic surgeon. The penalty I paid was missing eight months and basically learning to run all over again. The surgery is expensive. It is difficult to find an orthopod with the chops and experience to do it (I flew out of state to interview surgeons and ultimately went with the team orthopod for the UC Irvine track team). The surgery is not always successful. The PT afterward is expensive and time consuming. I am back stronger than ever but if I had to do it all over again, I would have healed it traditionally - with time. Good luck.

    answered almost 5 years ago |Report

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  • First off...to Matt M. above me, paragraphs exist for a reason. Avoiding huge blocks of text would be one of them.

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    @ Kris

    I developed my ITBS from overuse, aka, too much too soon. I ran 3-4 times a week and to help treat my ITBS, I walked as soon as the sharp pain appeared. Running through pain and inflammation will only make things worse. Do make sure to warm-up properly before hard efforts and always stretch and roll (with the roller) /after/ cooling down.

    Quick tips for proper rolling:
    - relax and breathe in a controlled manner (looong ins and looong outs, like yoga)
    - slow down the rolling and take it easy (this is not an aerobic exercise)
    - find tender the spots (you'll feel pain here) and stay there for around 10 seconds, until the pain subsides a bit (this helps release the knots)
    - again, remember to breathe (this is fundamental in keeping your muscles relaxed while it is being massaged)

    answered almost 5 years ago |Report

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  • See this link from the American Academy of Family Physicians for one of the best articles I've found on ITBS:
    http://www.aafp.org/afp/20050415/1545.html

    I've had (and still have, sometimes) ITB issues. I rec'd a cortisone injection a few years ago during marathon training, and this took care of the problem then. While training this year again for another marathon, it returned briefly. I began using a foam roller, but only occasionally.

    I think the roller and other stretching exercises help to address the issue of a IT Band tightness. In my case, however, I'm becoming more convinced that weak hip abductor muscles are the primary cause. The article linked above refers to hip muscle weakness as another cause of ITB problems. I've begun exercises aimed at strengthening these muscles.

    Good luck!

    answered almost 5 years ago |Report

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  • I had ITB issues after a recent 50K and couldn't run for more than 20 minutes. I started rolling morning and night. By rolling, I would start at the hip and move toward the knee. When I felt a "spot" I would stop there and hold for 30-45 seconds. I then continued to move in one direction toward the knee. I would repete this 2-3 times.

    I also took a couple of days off and used a neoprene knee brace. You can look at my log and see my progression... my 50k was on Oct 10th. I hope your recovery will be rapid.

    For me this is a very mystifiying injury.

    answered almost 5 years ago |edited almost 5 years ago |Report

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  • chek /Jeff Galaway ijurie free, site,.

    answered almost 5 years ago |Report

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