Answers/

General Running

How many miles should you put on a pair of shoes, before getting new ones?

asked about 5 years ago | Report

10 answers

scroll to bottom
  • i dont go by miles, i go by months. its about every 3. i get a new pair for cross country, winter base, track and summer base and 2 pairs of flats(one for xc and one for track)

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

    • 0
      thumbs up
    • 0
      thumbs down
  • The general consensus is around 500 miles. However, there are a lot of variables that come into play. Body type, gait and terrain can all either lengthen or shorten a shoe's life. Your body should also let you know when it is time for a new pair. Watch for unusual aches and pains as the miles add up. For example, if an easy day brings on unusual soreness to your knees/shins/ankles it may be time to hit the local running shop.

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

    • 2
      thumbs up
    • 0
      thumbs down
  • I never let my running shoes exceed 300 miles. I always determine their durability by miles only. For those first 300 miles I only use them to train, never using them for ordinary use. After 300 miles, I use them for any use and get a new pair. After a while I donate them at my local running store.
    Although when the occasion does rise, such as an injury or special event, I will buy a new pair. About 75 miles away from a marathon I replace them regardless of how many miles are on them so that they can have time to break in before the marathon.
    In my opinion shoes are the number one factor in determining your running ability. Numerous injuries can occur because of the shoes you wear. Without a good pair you will not run well. Determining the exact shoe you need requires a specialist or the experts at specialty running stores. Do not just go out and buy a pair for their looks, reasonable price, or even the brand. Get the pair that best fits you, the durability of the shoe, and the comfort level, or any other personal need you have. If that means paying a little bit more, so be it. If that means switching to another brand, OK. But once you find that right pair, your running progress will take off (literally).

    answered about 5 years ago |edited about 5 years ago |Report

    • 3
      thumbs up
    • 0
      thumbs down
  • I have a pair of (cheap) inserts that I've been using in my shoes for the past few years. It seems like my shoes last forever now. I think the arch support is what makes the biggest difference. My newest pair of shoes feels the same as my older pair when I have the inserts in. I would just go by feeling it out.

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

    • 0
      thumbs up
    • 0
      thumbs down
  • I try to get 500 miles ..Them sneaks are $$$$$$$..But I find my self looking at the bottums and saying,Hey !! What happened to the tread...I think they conspire to make the soles wear faster or maybe its those days my ass is draging...Come on Tim pick up your feet...4to5 hundred sweet pea..Tim

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

    • 0
      thumbs up
    • 0
      thumbs down
  • I try to get 500 miles as well. I am a heavy heal striker, so I have to "shoe goo" the heals to get there.

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

    • 0
      thumbs up
    • 0
      thumbs down
  • I never go much over 300 miles. If they are Nikes they last even less. You have to see how you feel. I also would consider if these shoes are used for other things and not just for running. I have around 230 miles on my current shoes but they start feeling too loose. I am starting to get heel pain. I am trying to get 1-2 more weeks out of them but also need to get 50 miles on my new shoes before my marathon in one month. I am putting in 30-40 miles most weeks right now. My shoes are only 2 months old but will soon become my mud and wet weather shoes.

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

    • 0
      thumbs up
    • 0
      thumbs down
  • What does "shoe Goo" the heals mean Ron L? Anyway I just put about 350 on my shoes and I could start to tell that my legs were getting fatigue sooner in my run. I think that my shoes where the cause of the problem. I will soon find out, as I will start to break in my new pair this week.

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

    • 0
      thumbs up
    • 0
      thumbs down
  • Depends on a lot, I find its about 300 - 600 miles depending on how hard Im running. When i was running 5-10km runs I'd get closer to 600 miles. Lately with running up to 30km distances Im down around 300 miles or less. I really feel it in my feet when the support starts giving out, so I know when the old shoes have to go!

    Basically the loss of support affects you more the longer you spend on your feet. Less distance means the shoes have less effect and wear less. But dont let that deter you, just shop smarter!! (I watch out for clearance sales of last seasons stock, usually pick up a new pair of good shoes for under half price, sometimes 2 pairs for less than a price of one)

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

    • 0
      thumbs up
    • 0
      thumbs down
  • My "rule" is 400 miles. I am about 180lbs. I find the shoes break-down right around 400 miles. There are exceptions, of course as there are many factors involved. I keep an eye on them as they approach about 300 miles. If I find they bend easily or if the mid-sole shows compression, I may retire them early. If they seem to be holding, I may let them go for an extra 100 miles. I also keep shoes in rotation so I never just switch from one pair to the next. I keep the shoes about 150 miles apart and when I retire one pair, I buy a new one. This was a bit expensive to start, but I find I have fewer injuries this way.

    answered about 5 years ago |Report

    • 0
      thumbs up
    • 0
      thumbs down

Similar Questions in Running - General Running