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Full Body Workout... is it Stupid???

asked about 2 years ago | Report

So I usually do fully body strength training 2-3 times a week (usually 3). A friend of mine who lifts weights says that it is completely STUPID for me to do that, and that I am ruining my muscle.. I just want some opinions on this.. I really dont have the extra hour 5-6 days a week on top of running and spinning...

My Computer will not let me respond to your answer. BUT yes he does have certain days that he does certain body parts.. and he runs twice a week NO MORE than a 1.5 miles. those 2 days are his "cardio" days.. His brother has a gym so they are into power lifting... And I don't usually do the same thing each time.

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  • In my opinion and experience, it completely depends on your goals and the type of workout.

    Full body workouts when done correctly are excellent, for those of us wanting to lose weight, develop muscle, and improve conditioning. As a multi-sport weekend (and weekday) warrior, they are a necessity. However, if your goal is to build 'significant' muscle (i.e., be a body builder or powerlifter) than you are wasting time. If you think about it, athletes do not workout like bodybuilders, which makes sense. Of course, athletes are not built like bodybuilders either.

    The other note is that if you are doing the same exercises all three days, that is not good. You could injure muscles/joints from the repition (e.g., pushups all three days can wear down your shoulders) but three full body workouts focusing on different movements, there is nothing wrong with that.

    Good luck!

    answered about 2 years ago |edited about 2 years ago |Report

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  • first I would ask what kind of workouts he's doing? Does he break it into "leg day" "chest and tri" day, "back and bi" day? If so, unless he's an actual competetive body builder, that's not a very good way to lift. 2-3 full body workouts are generally the best way to lift. At least if you're looking for general fitness and athleticism. If you're looking for hypertrophy (increased muscle volume) then it isn't going to help. Most real athletes do total workouts. You're not ruining your muscle (at least not from that) Make sure you eat some kind of protein and carbs after any hard workout, or you're not providing them with the building block for repair.

    answered about 2 years ago |Report

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  • You need to be careful who you listen to for advice. Alex & Justyn make some good points.

    Everyone thinks that what they do is "the best" thing to do. But that doesn't mean the workout is best for you, and it doesn't mean that the person giving advice knows what your goals and needs are.

    The best way to find out is to find a routine you like, that makes sense for your running schedule, and see how you react. For example, I used to do great with a heavy leg workout, my running times improved, but as I got into running more and more it was too much and I started to burnout, so now I scale back quite a bit on legs. Your body will tell you what is working if you listen to it carefully...

    answered about 2 years ago |Report

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  • There are as many exercise routines, it would seem, as there are people in the world. It really just depends on what YOU love to do and what kind of results you are looking for. I have plenty of friends who do their weight lifting in splits like you describe. They have "Leg Day" "Back and Biceps day" etc and etc... And that is the workout they love and it works for them. The workout you enjoy is running and doing strength training. Full body strength training is not stupid at all! It will build strength, lean muscle, burn fat, raise endorphins and give you the core stability needed to become an excellent runner. Don't give up your workout on the careless remarks of one individual.

    answered about 2 years ago |Report

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  • That's an old school theory. I've also been told by older trainers that running will ruin my muscle mass and various other things. I switched over to total body workouts 2 years ago and never looked back. I get the results I need in far less time, and I run every day - no reduction in muscle mass, but I'm not a fitness competitor just trying to keep enough muscle mass to be healthy and eat more :)

    answered about 2 years ago |Report

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